Wojciech Matusik

Articulated Mesh Animation from Multi-view Silhouettes
Details in mesh animations are difficult to generate but they have great impact on visual quality. In this work, we demonstrate a practical software system for capturing such details from multi-view video recordings. Given a stream of synchronized video images that record a human performance from multiple viewpoints and an articulated template of the performer, our system captures the motion of both the skeleton and the shape. The output mesh animation is enhanced with the details observed in the image silhouettes. For example, a performance in casual loose-fitting clothes will generate mesh animations with flowing garment motions. We accomplish this with a fast pose tracking method followed by nonrigid deformation of the template to fit the silhouettes.

Hair Photobooth: Geometric and Photometric Acquisition of Real Hairstyles
We accurately capture the shape and appearance of a person's hairstyle. We use triangulation and a sweep with planes of light for the geometry. Multiple projectors and cameras address the challenges raised by the reflectance and intricate geometry of hair. We introduce the use of structure tensors to infer the hidden geometry between the hair surface and the scalp. Our triangulation approach affords substantial accuracy improvement and we are able to measure elaborate hair geometry including complex curls and concavities. To reproduce the hair appearance, we capture a six-dimensional reflectance field. We introduce a new reflectance interpolation technique that leverages an analytical reflectance model to alleviate cross-fading artifacts caused by linear methods.

Practical Motion Capture in Everyday Surroundings
Commercial motion-capture systems produce excellent in-studio reconstructions, but offer no comparable solution for acquisition in everyday environments. We present a system for acquiring motions almost anywhere. This wearable system gathers ultrasonic time-of-flight and inertial measurements with a set of inexpensive miniature sensors worn on the garment. After recording, the information is combined using an Extended Kalman Filter to reconstruct joint configurations of a body. Experimental results show that even motions that are traditionally difficult to acquire are recorded with ease within their natural settings.

Opacity Light Fields
We present new hardware-accelerated techniques for rendering surface light fields with opacity hulls that allow for interactive visualization of objects that have complex reflectance properties and elaborate geometrical details. The opacity hull is a shape enclosing the object with view-dependent opacity parameterized onto that shape. We call the combination of opacity hulls and surface light fields the opacity light field. Opacity light fields are ideally suited for rendering of the visually complex objects and scenes obtained with 3D photography. We show how to implement opacity light fields in the framework of three surface light field rendering methods: viewdependent texture mapping, unstructured lumigraph rendering, and light field mapping.

Texture Design Using a Simplicial Complex of Morphable Textures
We present a system for designing novel textures in the space of textures induced by an input database. We capture the structure of the induced space by a simplicial complex where vertices of the simplices represent input textures. A user can generate new textures by interpolating within individual simplices. We propose a morphable interpolation for textures, which also defines a metric used to build the simplicial complex. To guarantee sharpness in interpolated textures, we enforce histograms of high-frequency content using a novel method for histogram interpolation. We allow users to continuously navigate in the simplicial complex and design new textures using a simple and efficient user interface.

Defocus Video Matting
Video matting is the process of pulling a high-quality alpha matte and foreground from a video sequence. Current techniques require either a known background (e.g., a blue screen) or extensive user interaction (e.g., to specify known foreground and background elements). The matting problem is generally under-constrained, since not enough information has been collected at capture time. We propose a novel, fully autonomous method for pulling a matte using multiple synchronized video streams that share a point of view but differ in their plane of focus. The solution is obtained by directly minimizing the error in filter-based image formation equations, which are over-constrained by our rich data stream.