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Algorithms & Theory , Big Data , Cybersecurity , Entertainment , Internet of Things , Manufacturing , Wireless
Algorithms & Theory , Big Data , Cybersecurity , Entertainment , Internet of Things , Manufacturing , Wireless

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More efficient lidar sensing for self-driving cars

If you see a self-driving car out in the wild, you might notice a giant spinning cylinder on top of its roof. That’s a lidar sensor, and it works by sending out pulses of infrared light and measuring the time it takes for them to bounce off objects. This creates a map of 3D points that serve as a snapshot of the car’s surroundings.

Forum examines promises and limits of AI in clinical medicine

The confluence of medicine and artificial intelligence stands to create truly high-performance, specialized care for patients, with enhanced precision diagnosis and personalized disease management. But to supercharge these systems we need massive amounts of personal health data, coupled with a delicate balance of privacy, transparency, and trust.

Articles

Forum examines promises and limits of AI in clinical medicine

The confluence of medicine and artificial intelligence stands to create truly high-performance, specialized care for patients, with enhanced precision diagnosis and personalized disease management. But to supercharge these systems we need massive amounts of personal health data, coupled with a delicate balance of privacy, transparency, and trust.

Removing health-care barriers and boundaries

MIT’s Amar Gupta and his wife Poonam were on a trip to Los Angeles in 2016 when she fell and broke both wrists. She was whisked by ambulance to a reputable hospital. But staff informed the couple that they couldn’t treat her there, nor could they find another local hospital that would do so. In the end, the couple was forced to take the hospital’s stunning advice: return to Boston for treatment.

Using machine learning to improve patient care

Doctors are often deluged by signals from charts, test results, and other metrics to keep track of. It can be difficult to integrate and monitor all of these data for multiple patients while making real-time treatment decisions, especially when data is documented inconsistently across hospitals. In a new pair of papers, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) explore ways for computers to help doctors make better medical decisions.

Videos

More efficient lidar sensing for self-driving cars

If you see a self-driving car out in the wild, you might notice a giant spinning cylinder on top of its roof. That’s a lidar sensor, and it works by sending out pulses of infrared light and measuring the time it takes for them to bounce off objects. This creates a map of 3D points that serve as a snapshot of the car’s surroundings.

Detecting emotions with wireless signals

As many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: a smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand.But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed “EQ-Radio,” a device that can detect a person’s emotions using wireless signals.

Ingestible origami robot can patch wounds inside your stomach!

In experiments involving a simulation of the human esophagus and stomach, researchers at CSAIL, the University of Sheffield, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated a tiny origami robot that can unfold itself from a swallowed capsule and, steered by external magnetic fields, crawl across the stomach wall to remove a swallowed button battery or patch a wound.The new work, which the researchers are presenting this week at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, builds on a long sequence of papers on origami robots from the research group of CSAIL Director Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.