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Algorithms & Theory , Robotics , Manufacturing
Algorithms & Theory , Robotics , Manufacturing

Giving soft robots senses

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Chasing complexity

In his junior year of high school, Ryan Williams transferred from the public school near his hometown of Somerville, Alabama — “essentially a courthouse and a couple gas stations,” as he describes it — to the Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile.

Articles

Chasing complexity

In his junior year of high school, Ryan Williams transferred from the public school near his hometown of Somerville, Alabama — “essentially a courthouse and a couple gas stations,” as he describes it — to the Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile.

Teleoperating robots with virtual reality

Certain industries have traditionally not had the luxury of telecommuting. Many manufacturing jobs, for example, require a physical presence to operate machinery. But what if such jobs could be done remotely? Last week researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) presented a virtual reality (VR) system that lets you teleoperate a robot using an Oculus Rift headset.

An algorithm for your blind spot

Light lets us see the things that surround us, but what if we could also use it to see things hidden around corners? It sounds like science fiction, but that’s the idea behind a new algorithm out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) — and its discovery has implications for everything from emergency response to self-driving cars.

Celebrating the life of doctoral student and alumnus Michael B. Cohen

Michael B. Cohen ’14, SM ’16 had a deep love for mathematics and the theoretical foundations of computing — a love that was infectious, brilliant, and always shared with others. Cohen, a doctoral student in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), died suddenly from natural causes in September. He was 25 years of age.

Bug-repair system learns from example

Anyone who’s downloaded an update to a computer program or phone app knows that most commercial software has bugs and security holes that require regular “patching.” Often, those bugs are simple oversights. For example, the program tries to read data that have already been deleted. The patches, too, are often simple — such as a single line of code that verifies that a data object still exists.

“Superhero” robot wears different outfits for different tasks

From butterflies that sprout wings to hermit crabs that switch their shells, many animals must adapt their exterior features in order to survive. While humans don’t undergo that kind of metamorphosis, we often try to create functional objects that are similarly adaptive — including our robots. Despite what you might have seen in “Transformers” movies, though, today’s robots are still pretty inflexible. Each of their parts usually has a fixed structure and a single defined purpose, making it difficult for them to perform a wide variety of actions.

Videos

Brain-controlled robots

For robots to do what we want, they need to understand us. Too often, this means having to meet them halfway: teaching them the intricacies of human language, for example, or giving them explicit commands for very specific tasks. But what if we could develop robots that were a more natural extension of us and that could actually do whatever we are thinking?

Talks