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Honda Research Institute Launches “Curious Minded Machine” Research Collaboration with MIT, University of Pennsylvania and University of Washington

Honda Research Institute USA seeks to develop intelligent systems that use curiosity to understand people’s needs and empower human capability through cross-disciplinary research that aims to advance breakthroughs in artificial cognition.

Meet CSAIL’s winners of the “Nobel Prize for computing”

Congratulations to this year's Nobel Prize winners! While computer science has no formal Nobel Prize, the Association for Computing Machinery’s A.M. Turing Award is often described as “the Nobel Prize of computing.”Over the years, more than a dozen CSAIL-affiliated computer scientists have receive the award - including four of the last nine winners.

Read below for more information about some of the honorees.


Articles

An AI for CGI

Given an image, MIT CSAIL's machine-learning system can smoothly separate the objects in it, enabling easier editing of photos - and, eventually, videos

Removing health-care barriers and boundaries

MIT’s Amar Gupta and his wife Poonam were on a trip to Los Angeles in 2016 when she fell and broke both wrists. She was whisked by ambulance to a reputable hospital. But staff informed the couple that they couldn’t treat her there, nor could they find another local hospital that would do so. In the end, the couple was forced to take the hospital’s stunning advice: return to Boston for treatment.

Videos

MIT engineering students team up with Georgetown lawyers-in-training on internet privacy legislation

Every spring, engineering students from MIT and law students from Georgetown University overcome the distance between their institutions and disciplines in a semester-long flurry of virtual classroom meetings and late-night Google hangout sessions, culminating in presentations to policy experts in DC.

Custom robots in a matter of minutes

Even as robots become increasingly common, they remain incredibly difficult to make. From designing and modeling to fabricating and testing, the process is slow and costly: Even one small change can mean days or weeks of rethinking and revising important hardware. But what if there were a way to let non-experts craft different robotic designs — in one sitting?

High-quality online video with less rebuffering

We’ve all experienced two hugely frustrating things on YouTube: our video either suddenly gets pixelated, or it stops entirely to rebuffer. Both happen because of special algorithms that break videos into small chunks that load as you go. If your internet is slow, YouTube might make the next few seconds of video lower resolution to make sure you can still watch uninterrupted — hence, the pixelation. If you try to skip ahead to a part of the video that hasn’t loaded yet, your video has to stall in order to buffer that part.

Talks