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Algorithms & Theory , Robotics , Manufacturing
Algorithms & Theory , Robotics , Manufacturing

Giving soft robots senses

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Removing health-care barriers and boundaries

MIT’s Amar Gupta and his wife Poonam were on a trip to Los Angeles in 2016 when she fell and broke both wrists. She was whisked by ambulance to a reputable hospital. But staff informed the couple that they couldn’t treat her there, nor could they find another local hospital that would do so. In the end, the couple was forced to take the hospital’s stunning advice: return to Boston for treatment.

3Q: D. Fox Harrell on his video game for the #MeToo era

The Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has released a new video game called Grayscale, which is designed to sensitize players to problems of sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual assault in the workplace.

Bug-repair system learns from example

Anyone who’s downloaded an update to a computer program or phone app knows that most commercial software has bugs and security holes that require regular “patching.” Often, those bugs are simple oversights. For example, the program tries to read data that have already been deleted. The patches, too, are often simple — such as a single line of code that verifies that a data object still exists.

Articles

Removing health-care barriers and boundaries

MIT’s Amar Gupta and his wife Poonam were on a trip to Los Angeles in 2016 when she fell and broke both wrists. She was whisked by ambulance to a reputable hospital. But staff informed the couple that they couldn’t treat her there, nor could they find another local hospital that would do so. In the end, the couple was forced to take the hospital’s stunning advice: return to Boston for treatment.

3Q: D. Fox Harrell on his video game for the #MeToo era

The Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) has released a new video game called Grayscale, which is designed to sensitize players to problems of sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual assault in the workplace.

Bug-repair system learns from example

Anyone who’s downloaded an update to a computer program or phone app knows that most commercial software has bugs and security holes that require regular “patching.” Often, those bugs are simple oversights. For example, the program tries to read data that have already been deleted. The patches, too, are often simple — such as a single line of code that verifies that a data object still exists.

Using machine learning to improve patient care

Doctors are often deluged by signals from charts, test results, and other metrics to keep track of. It can be difficult to integrate and monitor all of these data for multiple patients while making real-time treatment decisions, especially when data is documented inconsistently across hospitals. In a new pair of papers, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) explore ways for computers to help doctors make better medical decisions.

Faster page loads

A webpage today is often the sum of many different components. A user’s home page on a social-networking site, for instance, might display the latest posts from the users’ friends; the associated images, links, and comments; notifications of pending messages and comments on the user’s own posts; a list of events; a list of topics currently driving online discussions; a list of games, some of which are flagged to indicate that it’s the user’s turn; and of course the all-important ads, which the site depends on for revenues.

Videos

Detecting emotions with wireless signals

As many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: a smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand.But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed “EQ-Radio,” a device that can detect a person’s emotions using wireless signals.