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VIDEO: Does quantum computing seem too complicated? PI Scott Aaronson breaks it down in "Explained"




CSAIL Principal Investigator Scott Aaronson, an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, breaks down the intricacies of quantum computing in laymen's terms to share what it's about and why it's important.




Aaronson argues that quantum computing has implications for everything from pharmaceuticals to nanotechnology, from biochemistry to super conductors. 'For any of these applications,' he said, 'a quantum computer naturally implements those dynamics and gives you a speed-up for implementing those things.'

ACM Names Fellows for Computing Advances that Are Transforming Science and Society

ACM has recognized 50 of its members, including CSAIL researchers Nir Shavit and Dina Katabi, for their contributions to computing that are driving innovations across multiple domains and disciplines. The 2013 ACM Fellows, from the world's leading universities, corporations, and research labs, have achieved advances in computing research and development that are accelerating the digital revolution and impacting every dimension of how we live, work, and play.

Read more at http://www.acm.org/press-room/news-releases/2013/fellows-2013

The MIT Big Data Challenge: Transportation in the City of Boston is now open!

The MIT Big Data Challenge: Transportation in the City of Boston is now open!

What can we learn from 2.3 Million Taxi Rides?

To learn more about the challenge and the data, join us:

MEETUP: TUESDAY DEC 10 5:00-7:00pm
LOCATION: Stata Center, 32-G882, Hewlett Meeting Room
DETAILS and SIGN UP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-big-data-challenge-meetup-tickets-9532175995

Lots of free pizza! (of course)


***ABOUT THE CHALLENGE***

CHALLENGE WEBSITE: http://bigdatachallenge.csail.mit.edu/

OPEN: NOV 12 2013
END: JAN 20, 2014
PRIZES: $10K total

Charles Leiserson now AAAS Fellow

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recently awarded the distinction of fellow to Charles Leiserson, for distinguished contributions to the theory and practice of parallel and distributed computing, practical impact, and transfer of new knowledge to others.

Yuan Luo Awarded First Prize at Symposium

Yuan Luo, a PhD student in Professor Peter Szolovits' Clinical Decision Making Group, has been awarded the first prize at the Natural Language Processing Doctoral Consortium in 2013 American Medical Informatics Association's Annual Symposium. The presentation, "Subgraph Augmented Non-Negative Tensor Factorization (SANTF) in Medical Natural Language Processing", describes a new method for jointly modeling the interactions among higher-order features and atomic features by integrating them into the learning objective, at the same time performing dimensionality reduction in all types of features. The method not only leads to improved clustering of patient phenotype, but also produces latent groups of features that are consistent with clinical insights.

Cheung Honored with PhD Fellowship Program Award

CSAIL graduate student Alvin Cheung has been named one of the 2013 Intel Labs U.S. PhD Fellowship Program Awardees. Cheung was selected for his work with, "making database applications perform using program analysis."

Cheung is a graduate student in the MIT Database Group and the Computer-Aided Programming Group, and is currently working on building tools that make use of programming language techniques to improve application performance. His research interests include program analysis, improving database application performance, and building big systems in general.

Fano Celebrates 96th Birthday

On Monday, November 11, Professor Emeritus Robert Fano celebrated his 96th birthday. Fano was the Ford Professor of Engineering in the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science until his retirement in June 1984. He organized Project MAC (Multiple Access Computing or Machine-Aided Cognition), the predecessor to CSAIL, in 1963 and was its director until September 1968. He also served as associate head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1971 to 1974.

Researchers Win OOPSLA Best Paper Award

CSAIL researchers were honored with the Best Paper Award at the 2013 Association for Computing Machinery's Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications conference (OOPSLA) for their paper "Verifying Quantitative Reliability for Programs That Execute on Unreliable Hardware." The paper was written by CSAIL graduate students Michael Carbin and Sasa Misailovic, and Professor Martin Rinard.

The paper describes a new programming framework that enables software developers to specify when computing errors made by smaller and less reliant transistors may be tolerable. The system then calculates the probability that the software will perform as it's intended.

Rus Named Viterbi Professor

Professor Anantha Chandrakasan, head of the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has announced that Professor Daniela Rus, director of CSAIL, has been appointed the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Established in 1999 by Andrew and Erna Viterbi, the chair recognizes significant contributions in the field of communications and signal processing. Professor Ronald Rivest was the first chair holder of the Viterbi Professorship. Rus, a renowned roboticist, is known for spearheading research in programmable matter and distributed robotics.

Robot Locomotion Group wins ICRA Best Paper Award

CSAIL graduate student Anirudha Majumdar, postdoctoral associate Amir Ali Ahmadi, and Associate Professor Russ Tedrake were awarded the Best Conference Paper Award at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA). The group was honored for their paper "Control design along trajectories with sums of squares programming," which describes a new approach for robotic control techniques for tasks like walking, running and flying.

Using Computer Science to Determine How to Present Information Visually

New research by CSAIL Principal Research Scientist Aude Oliva provides new clues about the brain's visual memory. In collaboration with Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) doctoral student Michelle Borkin and Professor Hanspeter Pfister, Oliva and graduate students Zoya Bylinskii and Phillip Isola studied the memorability of a wide variety of visualizations to help decipher the best ways to present information visually.

Malik Opens 2013-2014 Dertouzos Lecturer Series with Talk on Computer Vision

Jitendra Malik, the Arthur J. Chick Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley, kicked off the 2013-2014 Dertouzos Lecturer Series on Thursday, October 10. Malik, who is renowned for his work in computer vision, discussed "The Three R's of Computer Vision: Recognition, Reconstruction and Reorganization" and his view on what progress is needed to further advance the field.

A self-assembling robot that can fly, jump and roll!

A team of researchers from Professor Daniela Rus’ Distributed Robotics Lab has developed a new type of self-assembling, jumping, flying rolling, modular robot called M-Blocks. The robots, “are cubes with no external moving parts. Nonetheless, they’re able to climb over and around one another, leap through the air, roll across the ground, and even move while suspended upside down from metallic surfaces,” wrote Larry Hardesty for the MIT News Office.

Researchers to Address Future of Wireless at One-Day Event

On Monday, October 7, reporters are invited to attend a one-day MIT event that will address some of the biggest challenges facing the wireless industry. Hosted by the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT), the event will showcase the latest cutting-edge research designed to tackle the biggest challenges facing the wireless industry, and will feature talks by MIT faculty and researchers, as well as demonstrations of next generation wireless and mobile systems.

Kellis Speaks on Future of Computational Biology at TEDx

On September 13, 2013, Associate Professor Manolis Kellis took the stage at TEDxCambridge to explain his work with computational biology and his hopes for the future of medicine. Using his own genome as an example, Kellis described his work using advanced computer science techniques to transform the field of medicine by taking a more personalized approach to treating patients.

As described in his talk, Kellis envisions a future where doctors and patients could access information on their personal genome to see whether certain combinations of medications, tailored to a person's specific genetic mutations, could help treat or even predict disease.

Katabi Named MacArthur Foundation Fellow

Professor Dina Katabi has been named one of the 2013 MacArthur Fellows. Often referred to as "genius grants," the MacArthur Fellows Program awards unrestricted fellowships to individuals who have "shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction."

The 2013 fellows will receive a $625,000 prize over a five-year period. Fellows are selected based on exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on a track record of significant accomplishment, and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work.

Computer scientists document ballet in birds-eye, time-lapse and slow-motion

CSAIL members created a video in collaboration with Boston Ballet that premiered premiere at the Boston Ballet Night of Stars on the Boston Common September 22. CSAIL principal investigator David Gifford and graduate student Adrian Dalca created the video by placing multiple small cameras in a Boston Ballet studio, shooting from two angles at various speeds to create a visual record of a day of rehearsal. The resulting footage was used for both time-lapse and slow-motion capture, and the segments were computationally manipulated to add effects and set to music.

Articles

VIDEO: Does quantum computing seem too complicated? PI Scott Aaronson breaks it down in "Explained"




CSAIL Principal Investigator Scott Aaronson, an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, breaks down the intricacies of quantum computing in laymen's terms to share what it's about and why it's important.




Aaronson argues that quantum computing has implications for everything from pharmaceuticals to nanotechnology, from biochemistry to super conductors. 'For any of these applications,' he said, 'a quantum computer naturally implements those dynamics and gives you a speed-up for implementing those things.'

ACM Names Fellows for Computing Advances that Are Transforming Science and Society

ACM has recognized 50 of its members, including CSAIL researchers Nir Shavit and Dina Katabi, for their contributions to computing that are driving innovations across multiple domains and disciplines. The 2013 ACM Fellows, from the world's leading universities, corporations, and research labs, have achieved advances in computing research and development that are accelerating the digital revolution and impacting every dimension of how we live, work, and play.

Read more at http://www.acm.org/press-room/news-releases/2013/fellows-2013

The MIT Big Data Challenge: Transportation in the City of Boston is now open!

The MIT Big Data Challenge: Transportation in the City of Boston is now open!

What can we learn from 2.3 Million Taxi Rides?

To learn more about the challenge and the data, join us:

MEETUP: TUESDAY DEC 10 5:00-7:00pm
LOCATION: Stata Center, 32-G882, Hewlett Meeting Room
DETAILS and SIGN UP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-big-data-challenge-meetup-tickets-9532175995

Lots of free pizza! (of course)


***ABOUT THE CHALLENGE***

CHALLENGE WEBSITE: http://bigdatachallenge.csail.mit.edu/

OPEN: NOV 12 2013
END: JAN 20, 2014
PRIZES: $10K total

Charles Leiserson now AAAS Fellow

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recently awarded the distinction of fellow to Charles Leiserson, for distinguished contributions to the theory and practice of parallel and distributed computing, practical impact, and transfer of new knowledge to others.

Yuan Luo Awarded First Prize at Symposium

Yuan Luo, a PhD student in Professor Peter Szolovits' Clinical Decision Making Group, has been awarded the first prize at the Natural Language Processing Doctoral Consortium in 2013 American Medical Informatics Association's Annual Symposium. The presentation, "Subgraph Augmented Non-Negative Tensor Factorization (SANTF) in Medical Natural Language Processing", describes a new method for jointly modeling the interactions among higher-order features and atomic features by integrating them into the learning objective, at the same time performing dimensionality reduction in all types of features. The method not only leads to improved clustering of patient phenotype, but also produces latent groups of features that are consistent with clinical insights.

Cheung Honored with PhD Fellowship Program Award

CSAIL graduate student Alvin Cheung has been named one of the 2013 Intel Labs U.S. PhD Fellowship Program Awardees. Cheung was selected for his work with, "making database applications perform using program analysis."

Cheung is a graduate student in the MIT Database Group and the Computer-Aided Programming Group, and is currently working on building tools that make use of programming language techniques to improve application performance. His research interests include program analysis, improving database application performance, and building big systems in general.

Fano Celebrates 96th Birthday

On Monday, November 11, Professor Emeritus Robert Fano celebrated his 96th birthday. Fano was the Ford Professor of Engineering in the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science until his retirement in June 1984. He organized Project MAC (Multiple Access Computing or Machine-Aided Cognition), the predecessor to CSAIL, in 1963 and was its director until September 1968. He also served as associate head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1971 to 1974.

Researchers Win OOPSLA Best Paper Award

CSAIL researchers were honored with the Best Paper Award at the 2013 Association for Computing Machinery's Object-Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications conference (OOPSLA) for their paper "Verifying Quantitative Reliability for Programs That Execute on Unreliable Hardware." The paper was written by CSAIL graduate students Michael Carbin and Sasa Misailovic, and Professor Martin Rinard.

The paper describes a new programming framework that enables software developers to specify when computing errors made by smaller and less reliant transistors may be tolerable. The system then calculates the probability that the software will perform as it's intended.

Rus Named Viterbi Professor

Professor Anantha Chandrakasan, head of the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has announced that Professor Daniela Rus, director of CSAIL, has been appointed the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Established in 1999 by Andrew and Erna Viterbi, the chair recognizes significant contributions in the field of communications and signal processing. Professor Ronald Rivest was the first chair holder of the Viterbi Professorship. Rus, a renowned roboticist, is known for spearheading research in programmable matter and distributed robotics.

Robot Locomotion Group wins ICRA Best Paper Award

CSAIL graduate student Anirudha Majumdar, postdoctoral associate Amir Ali Ahmadi, and Associate Professor Russ Tedrake were awarded the Best Conference Paper Award at the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA). The group was honored for their paper "Control design along trajectories with sums of squares programming," which describes a new approach for robotic control techniques for tasks like walking, running and flying.

Using Computer Science to Determine How to Present Information Visually

New research by CSAIL Principal Research Scientist Aude Oliva provides new clues about the brain's visual memory. In collaboration with Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) doctoral student Michelle Borkin and Professor Hanspeter Pfister, Oliva and graduate students Zoya Bylinskii and Phillip Isola studied the memorability of a wide variety of visualizations to help decipher the best ways to present information visually.

Malik Opens 2013-2014 Dertouzos Lecturer Series with Talk on Computer Vision

Jitendra Malik, the Arthur J. Chick Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley, kicked off the 2013-2014 Dertouzos Lecturer Series on Thursday, October 10. Malik, who is renowned for his work in computer vision, discussed "The Three R's of Computer Vision: Recognition, Reconstruction and Reorganization" and his view on what progress is needed to further advance the field.

A self-assembling robot that can fly, jump and roll!

A team of researchers from Professor Daniela Rus’ Distributed Robotics Lab has developed a new type of self-assembling, jumping, flying rolling, modular robot called M-Blocks. The robots, “are cubes with no external moving parts. Nonetheless, they’re able to climb over and around one another, leap through the air, roll across the ground, and even move while suspended upside down from metallic surfaces,” wrote Larry Hardesty for the MIT News Office.

Researchers to Address Future of Wireless at One-Day Event

On Monday, October 7, reporters are invited to attend a one-day MIT event that will address some of the biggest challenges facing the wireless industry. Hosted by the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT), the event will showcase the latest cutting-edge research designed to tackle the biggest challenges facing the wireless industry, and will feature talks by MIT faculty and researchers, as well as demonstrations of next generation wireless and mobile systems.

Kellis Speaks on Future of Computational Biology at TEDx

On September 13, 2013, Associate Professor Manolis Kellis took the stage at TEDxCambridge to explain his work with computational biology and his hopes for the future of medicine. Using his own genome as an example, Kellis described his work using advanced computer science techniques to transform the field of medicine by taking a more personalized approach to treating patients.

As described in his talk, Kellis envisions a future where doctors and patients could access information on their personal genome to see whether certain combinations of medications, tailored to a person's specific genetic mutations, could help treat or even predict disease.

Katabi Named MacArthur Foundation Fellow

Professor Dina Katabi has been named one of the 2013 MacArthur Fellows. Often referred to as "genius grants," the MacArthur Fellows Program awards unrestricted fellowships to individuals who have "shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction."

The 2013 fellows will receive a $625,000 prize over a five-year period. Fellows are selected based on exceptional creativity, promise for important future advances based on a track record of significant accomplishment, and potential for the fellowship to facilitate subsequent creative work.

Computer scientists document ballet in birds-eye, time-lapse and slow-motion

CSAIL members created a video in collaboration with Boston Ballet that premiered premiere at the Boston Ballet Night of Stars on the Boston Common September 22. CSAIL principal investigator David Gifford and graduate student Adrian Dalca created the video by placing multiple small cameras in a Boston Ballet studio, shooting from two angles at various speeds to create a visual record of a day of rehearsal. The resulting footage was used for both time-lapse and slow-motion capture, and the segments were computationally manipulated to add effects and set to music.

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