left image

Do you have a story idea?

We are interested in stories about current research projects as well as lab history. We can provide help with writing the story and taking pictures. If you are interested email news@csail.mit.edu

CSAIL News RSS Feed: Want to keep up with the most current stories about CSAIL? Subscribe to our feed. Learn more about RSS feeds.

News in Exhibit: CSAIL news articles displayed with the interactive Simile group research project Exhibit. Take a look!

Press Inquiries: If you are a member of the press interested in talking to someone in CSAIL, please contact Adam Conner-Simons at 617-324-9135 or at aconner@csail.mit.edu.

left image

  • Srini Devadas wins IEEE’s McDowell AwardThis week it was announced that CSAIL principal investigator Srini Devadas is the 2017 recipient of the IEEE W. Wallace McDowell Award, given for “fundamental contributions that have shaped the field of secure hardware, impacting circuits, microprocessors, and systems.” The McDowell Award is given...
  • Learn a language while you wait for WiFi Hyper-connectivity has changed the way we communicate, wait, and productively use our time. Even in a world of 5G wireless and “instant” messaging, there are countless moments throughout the day when we’re waiting for messages, texts, and Snapchats to refresh. But our frustrations with...
  • Explained: Neural networks In the past 10 years, the best-performing artificial-intelligence systems — such as the speech recognizers on smartphones or Google’s latest automatic translator — have resulted from a technique called “deep learning.”
  • D. Fox Harrell promoted to full professorIt was recently announced that CSAIL principal investigator D. Fox Harrell will be promoted to full professor in July.

 Harrell is Professor of Digital Media (July 1st, 2017) in both the Comparative Media Studies Program and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT. His...
  • CSAIL director Daniela Rus wins Engelberger Robotics AwardThis week CSAIL Director Daniela Rus was presented with the Engelberger Robotics Award recipient for her instrumental work as a leader, educator, and pioneer in the field of robotics. The Robotic Industries Association (RIA) presented the award at Automate 2017 and the International Symposium on...
  • Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award MIT Professor Tim Berners-Lee, the researcher who invented the World Wide Web and is one of the world’s most influential voices for online privacy and government transparency, has won the most prestigious honor in computer science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing...
  • Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award, "the Nobel Prize for computing"MIT Professor Tim Berners-Lee, the researcher who invented the World Wide Web and is one of the world’s most influential voices for online privacy and government transparency, has won the most prestigious honor in computer science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing Award...
  • Study shows dangers of distracted drivingUsing mobile data, CSAIL spinoff Cambridge Mobile Telematics (CMT) released a new study on the dangers of distracted driving that found that phone distraction occurred in the majority (52 percent) of all crashes.CMT’s apps give users insight and tangible information into their habits and actions...
  • MIT experts urge Trump administration to take immediate action on cybersecurityIn a world where hackers can sabotage power plants and impact elections, there has never been a more crucial time to examine cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, most of which is privately owned. According to MIT experts, over the last 25 years presidents from both parties have paid...
  • MIT experts urge Trump administration to take immediate action on cybersecurityIn a world where hackers can sabotage power plants and impact elections, there has never been a more crucial time to examine cybersecurity for critical infrastructure, most of which is privately owned. According to MIT experts, over the last 25 years presidents from both parties have...
  • Faster page loads A webpage today is often the sum of many different components. A user’s home page on a social-networking site, for instance, might display the latest posts from the users’ friends; the associated images, links, and comments; notifications of pending messages and comments on the user’s own...
  • Toward printable, sensor-laden “skin” for robots In this age of smartphones and tablet computers, touch-sensitive surfaces are everywhere. They’re also brittle, as people with cracked phone screens everywhere can attest. Covering a robot — or an airplane or a bridge — with sensors will require a technology that is both flexible and cost-...
  • Protecting web users’ privacy Most website visits these days entail a database query — to look up airline flights, for example, or to find the fastest driving route between two addresses. But online database queries can reveal a surprising amount of information about the people making them. And some travel sites have...
  • A better TCP? System lets you test alternatives 20x faster & w/o changing hardware The transmission control protocol, or TCP, which manages traffic on the internet, was first proposed in 1974. Some version of TCP still regulates data transfer in most major data centers, the huge warehouses of servers maintained by popular websites.
  • Security for multirobot systemsDistributed planning, communication, and control algorithms for autonomous robots make up a major area of research in computer science. But in the literature on multirobot systems, security has gotten relatively short shrift.
  • Security for multirobot systems Distributed planning, communication, and control algorithms for autonomous robots make up a major area of research in computer science.
  • Daniel Zuo: Creative approaches to connectivity Distributed planning, communication, and control algorithms for autonomous robots make up a major area of research in computer science.
  • New AI tool improves cognitive testing One good piece of news in recent years is that people around the world are living longer. The downside to this news is that older age exposes more of us to varieties of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer’s disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the number of people with this...
  • Cutting down the clutter in online conversations From Reddit to Quora, discussion forums can be equal parts informative and daunting. We’ve all fallen down rabbit holes of lengthy threads that are impossible to sift through. Comments can be redundant, off-topic or even inaccurate, but all that content is ultimately still there for us to...
  • Former White House adviser to lead new cybersecurity project at MITToday MIT announced that a former major White House adviser is joining the Institute to direct a new project focused on cybersecurity and the economy. R. David Edelman served on President Obama's National Economic Council, National Security Council and the Office of Science and Technology Policy....
  • AI beats pros at Super Smash Bros.Game-playing artificial intelligence has proved to be a game-changer for even the most seasoned veterans.
  • Brain-controlled robots For robots to do what we want, they need to understand us. Too often, this means having to meet them halfway: teaching them the intricacies of human language, for example, or giving them explicit commands for very specific tasks. But what if we could develop robots that were a more natural...
  • Putting data in the hands of doctorsRegina Barzilay is working with MIT students and medical doctors in an ambitious bid to revolutionize cancer care. She is relying on a tool largely unrecognized in the oncology world but deeply familiar to hers: machine learning.  Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical...
  • Voice control everywhere The butt of jokes as little as 10 years ago, automatic speech recognition is now on the verge of becoming people’s chief means of interacting with their principal computing devices. In anticipation of the age of voice-controlled electronics, MIT researchers have built a low-power chip...
  • Putting data in the hands of doctors Regina Barzilay is working with MIT students and medical doctors in an ambitious bid to revolutionize cancer care. She is relying on a tool largely unrecognized in the oncology world but deeply familiar to hers: machine learning. 
  • Adding a splash of human intuition to planning algorithms Every other year, the International Conference on Automated Planning and Scheduling hosts a competition in which computer systems designed by conference participants try to find the best solution to a planning problem, such as scheduling flights or coordinating tasks for teams of autonomous...
  • CSAIL PhD has made seven robots, and still finds time to meditate.For Julian Straub, one man’s trash truly became his treasure when a microcontroller sparked a keen interest in the field of robotics and artificial intelligence. The German native is a fourth-year EECS student studying how robots can better understand their surroundings. Straub studied electrical...
  • Wearable AI system can detect a conversation's toneIt’s a fact of nature that a single conversation can be interpreted in very different ways. For people with anxiety or conditions such as Asperger’s, this can make social situations extremely stressful. But what if there was a more objective way to measure and understand our interactions?...
  • Wearable AI system can detect a conversation's tone It’s a fact of nature that a single conversation can be interpreted in very different ways. For people with anxiety or conditions such as Asperger’s, this can make social situations extremely stressful. But what if there was a more objective way to measure and understand our interactions?
  • Optimizing code Compilers are programs that convert computer code written in high-level languages intelligible to humans into low-level instructions executable by machines. But there’s more than one way to implement a given computation, and modern compilers extensively analyze the code they process, trying...
  • Faster websites with fewer bugs Today, loading a web page on a big website usually involves a database query — to retrieve the latest contributions to a discussion you’re participating in, a list of news stories related to the one you’re reading, links targeted to your geographic location, or the like. But database queries...
  • SMART automation Daniela Rus loves Singapore. As the MIT professor sits down in her Frank Gehry-designed office in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to talk about her research conducted in Singapore, her face starts to relax in a big smile.
  • Taming data The age of big data has seen a host of new techniques for analyzing large data sets. But before any of those techniques can be applied, the target data has to be aggregated, organized, and cleaned up.
  • WATCH: VR video explains how VR worksHow can a tiny cardboard box make you feel like you're miles away at a sandy beach? CSAIL PhD student Valentina Shin explains virtual reality in this 360-degree VR video:
  • Split-second data mappingPeople generally associate graphic processing units (GPUs) with imaging processing. Developed for video games in the 1990s, modern GPUs are specialized circuits with thousands of small, efficient processing units, or “cores,” that work simultaneously to rapidly render graphics on screen.But for the...
  • Model sheds light on purpose of inhibitory neurons Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a new computational model of a neural circuit in the brain, which could shed light on the biological role of inhibitory neurons — neurons that keep other neurons from firing. The model describes a...
  • STUDY: CARPOOLING APPS COULD REDUCE TAXI TRAFFIC 75% Traffic is not just a nuisance for drivers: it’s also a public-health hazard and bad news for the economy.
  • Creating videos of the futureLiving in a dynamic physical world, it’s easy to forget how effortlessly we understand our surroundings. With minimal thought, we can figure out how scenes change and objects interact. But what’s second nature for us is still a huge problem for machines. With the limitless number of ways that...
  • Ingestible robots, glasses-free 3-D, and computers that explain themselves Machines that predict the future, robots that patch wounds, and wireless emotion-detectors are just a few of the exciting projects that came out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) this year. Here’s a sampling of 16 highlights from 2016 that span the...
  • CSAIL's 16 best Tweets of 2016The “Dragon Book,” Margaret Hamilton, and the first single-chip CPU topped our Twitter feed this past year, alongside tweets about computer science news, our research, and other topics in coding and programming. We’ve rounded up the top 16 tweets of 2016, determined by number of retweets from our...
  • Data diversityWhen data sets get too big, sometimes the only way to do anything useful with them is to extract much smaller subsets and analyze those instead. Those subsets have to preserve certain properties of the full sets, however, and one property that’s useful in a wide range of applications is diversity....
  • Making big data manageableOne way to handle big data is to shrink it. If you can identify a small subset of your data set that preserves its salient mathematical relationships, you may be able to perform useful analyses on it that would be prohibitively time consuming on the full set.
  • Four CSAIL researchers named ACM fellowsThis week the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM) announced its 2016 fellows, which include four principal investigators from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL): professors Erik Demaine, Fredo Durand, William Freeman, and Daniel Jackson. They were among the 1...
  • Learning words from picturesSpeech recognition systems, such as those that convert speech to text on cellphones, are generally the result of machine learning. A computer pores through thousands or even millions of audio files and their transcriptions, and learns which acoustic features correspond to which typed words. But...
  • Design your own custom droneThis fall’s new Federal Aviation Administration regulations have made drone flight easier than ever for both companies and consumers. But what if the drones out on the market aren’t exactly what you want? A new system from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)...
  • Enabling wireless virtual realityOne of the limits of today’s virtual reality (VR) headsets is that they have to be tethered to computers in order to process data well enough to deliver high-resolution visuals. But wearing an HDMI cable reduces mobility and can even lead to users tripping over cords. Fortunately, researchers from...
  • Computer learns to recognize sounds by watching videoIn recent years, computers have gotten remarkably good at recognizing speech and images: Think of the dictation software on most cellphones, or the algorithms that automatically identify people in photos posted to Facebook. But recognition of natural sounds — such as crowds cheering or waves...
  • Face to face with "The Enemy"When the filmmaking pioneers Auguste and Louis Lumière screened their 1895 film, "The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat," audiences were so frightened by the real appearance of the image that they screamed and got out of the way — or so a well-known anecdote goes. Today, as one enters a virtual...
  • How the brain recognizes facesMIT researchers and their colleagues have developed a new computational model of the human brain’s face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed. The researchers designed a machine-learning system that implemented their model, and they...
  • Study: carpooling apps could reduce taxi traffic 75%Traffic is not just a nuisance for drivers: it’s also a public-health hazard and bad news for the economy.Transportation studies put the annual cost of congestion at $160 billion, which includes 7 billion hours of time lost to sitting in traffic and an extra 3 billion gallons of fuel burned. One...
Syndicate content