left image

Do you have a story idea?

We are interested in stories about current research projects as well as lab history. We can provide help with writing the story and taking pictures. If you are interested email news@csail.mit.edu

CSAIL News RSS Feed: Want to keep up with the most current stories about CSAIL? Subscribe to our feed. Learn more about RSS feeds.

News in Exhibit: CSAIL news articles displayed with the interactive Simile group research project Exhibit. Take a look!

Press Inquiries: If you are a member of the press interested in talking to someone in CSAIL, please contact Adam Conner-Simons at 617-324-9135 or at aconner@csail.mit.edu.

left image

  • Design your own custom droneThis fall’s new Federal Aviation Administration regulations have made drone flight easier than ever for both companies and consumers. But what if the drones out on the market aren’t exactly what you want? A new system from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)...
  • Enabling wireless virtual realityOne of the limits of today’s virtual reality (VR) headsets is that they have to be tethered to computers in order to process data well enough to deliver high-resolution visuals. But wearing an HDMI cable reduces mobility and can even lead to users tripping over cords. Fortunately, researchers from...
  • Computer learns to recognize sounds by watching videoIn recent years, computers have gotten remarkably good at recognizing speech and images: Think of the dictation software on most cellphones, or the algorithms that automatically identify people in photos posted to Facebook. But recognition of natural sounds — such as crowds cheering or waves...
  • How the brain recognizes facesMIT researchers and their colleagues have developed a new computational model of the human brain’s face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed. The researchers designed a machine-learning system that implemented their model, and they...
  • Creating videos of the futureLiving in a dynamic physical world, it’s easy to forget how effortlessly we understand our surroundings. With minimal thought, we can figure out how scenes change and objects interact. But what’s second nature for us is still a huge problem for machines. With the limitless number of ways that...
  • Meeting of the minds for machine intelligenceSurviving breast cancer changed the course of Regina Barzilay’s research. The experience showed her, in stark relief, that oncologists and their patients lack tools for data-driven decision making. That includes what treatments to recommend, but also whether a patient’s sample even warrants a...
  • Entanglement bonanzaQuantum computers promise huge speedups on some computational problems because they harness a strange physical property called entanglement, in which the physical state of one tiny particle depends on measurements made of another. In quantum computers, entanglement is a computational resource,...
  • Making computers explain themselvesIn recent years, the best-performing systems in artificial-intelligence research have come courtesy of neural networks, which look for patterns in training data that yield useful predictions or classifications. A neural net might, for instance, be trained to recognize certain objects in digital...
  • Was your vote counted? Our crypto expert weighs inVoters can then go to an online database that lists their encrypted receipt and shows that it matches up with the one they picked up at the ballot box. Watch Professor Rivest explain the concept on Numberphile:
  • Teaching Hong Kong students to embrace computational thinkingCoolThink@JC, a four-year initiative of The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, was launched today to empower the city’s primary school teachers and students with computational thinking skills, including coding. Developed through a collaboration with MIT's Computer Science and Artificial...
  • Enabling wireless virtual realityOne of the limits of today’s virtual reality (VR) headsets is that they have to be tethered to computers in order to process data well enough to deliver high-resolution visuals. But wearing an HDMI cable reduces mobility and can even lead to users tripping over cords. Fortunately, researchers from...
  • Driverless-vehicle options now include scootersAt MIT’s 2016 Open House last spring, more than 100 visitors took rides on an autonomous mobility scooter in a trial of software designed by researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the National University of Singapore, and the Singapore-MIT Alliance...
  • Faster programs, easier programmingDynamic programming is a technique that can yield relatively efficient solutions to computational problems in economics, genomic analysis, and other fields. But adapting it to computer chips with multiple “cores,” or processing units, requires a level of programming expertise that few economists...
  • CSAIL founder Robert Fano honored at 11/4 memorialRobert “Bob” Fano, a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) whose work helped usher in the personal computing age, died in Naples, Florida on July 13. He was 98.
  • CSAIL welcomes 6 new EECS facultyCSAIL welcomes six new faculty members to MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)! The new faculty include Adam Belay, Stefanie Mueller, Max Shulakar, David Sontag, Ryan Williams and Virginia Vassilev Williams. Adam Belay will join as an assistant professor in...
  • Finding patterns in corrupted dataData analysis — and particularly big-data analysis — is often a matter of fitting data to some sort of mathematical model. The most familiar example of this might be linear regression, which finds a line that approximates a distribution of data points. But fitting data to probability distributions...
  • Making computers explain themselvesIn recent years, the best-performing systems in artificial-intelligence research have come courtesy of neural networks, which look for patterns in training data that yield useful predictions or classifications. A neural net might, for instance, be trained to recognize certain objects in digital...
  • Making it easier to collaborate on codeGit is an open-source system with a polarizing reputation among programmers. It’s a powerful tool to help developers track changes to code, but many view it as prohibitively difficult to use. To make it more user-friendly, a team from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (...
  • MRIs for fetal healthResearchers from MIT, Boston Children's Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital have joined forces in an ambitious new project to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the health of fetuses. Typically, fetal development is monitored with ultrasound imaging, which is cheap and...
  • CSAIL computer vision team leads scene parsing challengeThis week a team from CSAIL’s computer vision group co-hosted the first Scene Parsing Challenge at the 2016 European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) in Amsterdam. The challenge was focused on scene recognition, and using data to enable algorithms to classify and segment objects in scenes....
  • Prepping a robot for its journey to MarsSarah Hensley is preparing an astronaut named Valkyrie for a mission to Mars. It is 6 feet tall, weighs 300 pounds, and is equipped with an extended chest cavity that makes it look distinctly female. Hensley spends much of her time this semester analyzing the movements of one of Valkyrie's arms. As...
  • Ankur Moitra named a 2016 Packard FellowAnkur Moitra, the Rockwell International Career Development Associate Professor of Mathematics, was named a 2016 David and Lucile Packard Fellow. Each of this year’s 18 award recipients will receive a five-year, unrestricted research grant totaling $875,000. “The mathematics department is extremely...
  • Epoch Foundation celebrates nearly 20 years of collaboration with CSAILIn 1998 there were no iPhones, no touchscreens and no Facebook, but there was the beginning of an idea. That idea was for MIT’s best and brightest computer scientists to join forces with a group of forward-looking global businesses, with the goal of helping invent the future of computing. Almost 20...
  • Professor Emeritus Whitman Richards dies at 84Whitman Richards '53, PhD '65, professor emeritus of cognitive sciences and of media arts and sciences and principal investigator in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, died on Sept. 16 after a long battle with myelofibrosis. One of the first four PhD graduates of the...
  • Cambridge Cyber Summit convenes industry, academia, and governmentOn Oct. 5, MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) hosted a summit that brought together cybersecurity experts from business, government, and academia to talk about better ways to combat cyber-threats directed at companies and countries. Co-organized by the Aspen...
  • Designing for 3-D printing3-D printing has progressed over the last decade to include multi-material fabrication, enabling production of powerful, functional objects. While many advances have been made, it still has been difficult for non-programmers to create objects made of many materials (or mixtures of materials)...
  • CSAIL spin-off helps launch Mayor Walsh's "Boston's Safest Driver" contestBoston’s roads may be getting a little safer, thanks to drivers’ mobile phones. Traditionally one of the biggest sources of driver distraction, a new competition from the city of Boston is putting mobile phones to work to measure and improve users’ driving. CSAIL spin-off Cambridge Mobile...
  • 3-D-printed robots with shock-absorbing skinsAnyone who’s watched drone videos or an episode of “BattleBots” knows that robots can break — and often it’s because they don’t have the proper padding to protect themselves. But this week researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) will present a new method...
  • Automated screening for childhood communication disordersFor children with speech and language disorders, early-childhood intervention can make a great difference in their later academic and social success. But many such children — one study estimates 60 percent — go undiagnosed until kindergarten or even later. Researchers at the Computer Science and...
  • NSA Director Admiral Michael Rogers to open Cambridge Cyber Summit 10/5It was announced today that National Security Agency Director and US Cyber Command Commander Admiral Michael Rogers will open our upcoming Cambridge Cyber Summit October 5, in conversation with The Aspen Institute’s President and CEO, Walter Isaacson. Join us to hear insights from Fort Meade as the...
  • Cache management improved once againA year ago, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory unveiled a fundamentally new way of managing memory on computer chips, one that would use circuit space much more efficiently as chips continue to comprise more and more cores, or processing units. In chips...
  • Y. Bryce Kim PhD `17 wins NSF awardThis month CSAIL PhD candidate Yongwook Bryce Kim ‘17 received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Award for Young Professionals Contributing to Smart and Connected Health at the 38th Annual IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC’16). The theme of the conference was “empowering...
  • Detecting emotions with wireless signalsAs many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: a smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand. But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?...
  • An autonomous fleet for AmsterdamMIT has signed an agreement to engage in research collaborations with the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS) in the Netherlands. The collaboration’s flagship project will be co-led by Daniela Rus, director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence...
  • Faster parallel computingIn today’s computer chips, memory management is based on what computer scientists call the principle of locality: If a program needs a chunk of data stored at some memory location, it probably needs the neighboring chunks as well. But that assumption breaks down in the age of big data, now that...
  • CSAIL director Daniela Rus on robots, AI & how to get girls into codingCSAIL Director Daniela Rus sat down with Forbes Magazine to discuss robotics, artificial intelligence, and inspiring other women in the field of computer science. “Our goal is to invent the future of computing. We want to use computer science to tackle major challenges in fields like healthcare and...
  • CSAIL to host “Cambridge Cyber Summit” with CNBC & Aspen Institute 10/5Today the Aspen Institute, CNBC, and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) announced the first-ever “Cambridge Cyber Summit” on October 5 at Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus. The one-day summit will bring together C-suite executives and business owners with public and...
  • Heads of NSA, FBI, Akamai to discuss cybersecurity at CSAIL summit w/CNBC & Aspen InstituteThe Aspen Institute, CNBC, and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) are organizing the first-ever “Cambridge Cyber Summit” on October 5 at Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus. The one-day summit will bring together C-suite executives and business owners with public and...
  • How machine learning can help with voice disordersThere’s no human instinct more basic than speech, and yet, for many people, talking can be taxing. One in 14 working-age Americans suffer from voice disorders that are often associated with abnormal vocal behaviors — some of which can cause damage to vocal cord tissue and lead to the formation of...
  • This app will make you a safer driverIn April CSAIL researchers led the launch of EverDrive, an app aimed at improving people's driving by measuring habits like speeding, acceleration, hard turning, harsh braking and phone distractions. This week the team's spinoff company, Cambridge Mobile Telematics (CMT), crunched the...
  • Solving network congestionThere are few things more frustrating than trying to use your phone on a crowded network. With phone usage growing faster than wireless spectrum, we’re all now fighting over smaller and smaller bits of bandwidth. Spectrum crunch is such a big problem that the White House is getting involved,...
  • Researcher named to Tech Review’s 2016 “Under 35” listCSAIL researcher Dinesh Bharadia was just named by MIT Technology Review to their annual list of the top innovators under the age of 35, joining the likes of Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, and major leaders from Apple, PayPal and other tech companies....
  • Programmable network routersLike all data networks, the networks that connect servers in giant server farms, or servers and workstations in large organizations, are prone to congestion. When network traffic is heavy, packets of data can get backed up at network routers or dropped altogether. Also like all data networks, big...
  • NASA launches $1 million challenge to program space robotsIn the spring CSAIL received a six-foot-tall, 300-pound humanoid robot that NASA hopes to have serve on future space missions to Mars and beyond. This week, NASA formally opened registration for its Space Robotics Challenge, which involves research teams programming Valkyrie for a variety...
  • MIT team: over 4,000 gas leaks in Boston may have gone unrepaired last yearGas leaks are bad news for many reasons. They contribute to greenhouse gas buildup, disproportionately contribute to methane emissions, and can be physically dangerous to the people around them.But according to a team led by a CSAIL data scientist, utility companies like National grid and...
  • Simit programming language can speed up simulations 200x, reduce code 90 percentComputer simulations of physical systems are common in science, engineering, and entertainment, but they use several different types of tools. If, say, you want to explore how a crack forms in an airplane wing, you need a very precise physical model of the crack’s immediate vicinity. But if you...
  • Cybersecurity paper on government backdoors earns 2016 EFF awardA team from CSAIL has been awarded the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) 2016 Pioneer Award for their paper “Keys Under Doormats” on government backdoors and data security. EFF instituted the award in 1992 to spotlight those dedicated to expanding freedom and creativity in the technology sector....
  • Protecting privacy in genomic databasesGenome-wide association studies, which try to find correlations between particular genetic variations and disease diagnoses, are a staple of modern medical research. But because they depend on databases that contain people’s medical histories, they carry privacy risks. An attacker armed with...
  • Where do America's worst drivers live?In April CSAIL researchers led the launch of EverDrive, an app aimed at improving people's driving by measuring habits like speeding, acceleration, hard turning, harsh braking and phone distractions. This week the team from Cambridge Mobile Telematics (CMT) crunched three months of numbers to...
  • Reach in and touch objects in videos with “Interactive Dynamic Video”We learn a lot about objects by manipulating them: poking, pushing, prodding, and then seeing how they react. We obviously can’t do that with videos — just try touching that cat video on your phone and see what happens. But is it crazy to think that we could take that video and simulate how the cat...
Syndicate content