UROP Research Opportunities

The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) cultivates and supports research partnerships between MIT undergraduates and faculty. If you have any questions please contact kyleb@mit.edu or take a look at the How to UROP at CSAIL document (pdf format).  

This program is available to MIT students only.


 

  • Interactive Data Visualization for Everyone the Web

    Faculty Advisor: David Karger
    Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu
    Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces
    Exhibit (Link ) is an open source Javascript library that helps non-programmers author and publish rich interactive data visualizations on the web. We use Exhibit to push the boundaries of web authoring without programming, with our ultimate goal being to enable end-users to WYSIWYG-author complete web applications. Exhibit has been adopted on over a thousand web sites by hobbyists, scientists, merchants, and journalists...

    Posted date: April 04, 2013
  • Interactive Data Visualization for Journalists using Wordpress

    Faculty Advisor: David Karger
    Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu
    Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces
    There's a new movement in journalism to incorporate rich data visualization in news stories, but many journalists lack that skills to create their own "news apps" for this purpose. We've prototyped a data visualization framework, Datapress (Link ) to support authoring (not programming) such...

    Posted date: April 04, 2013
  • The Future Textbook

    Faculty Advisor: David Karger
    Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu
    Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces
    Now that we can put textbooks on the web, how can we change them to make them better? How can we make them more dynamic, more adaptable to individual students, more sociable, or more informative? We've tackled some of these questions with Nb (Link ), tool that lets students hold forum-type discussions in the margins of their...

    Posted date: April 04, 2013
  • Transparent Web Browsing

    Faculty Advisor: David Karger
    Contact e-mail: karger@mit.edu
    Research Area(s): Graphics and Human-Computer Interfaces
    Nowadays, all sorts of shady companies are collecting information about your browsing activities and using it for their own mysterious purposes. How could that information be used to your benefit? We propose to build Eyebrowse, a web browser extension that gathers information about your web browsing activities and shares that information (under your control) with...

    Posted date: April 04, 2013
  • Grammatical structure in developmental protein/DNA binding

    Cells choose their identity as a result of combinatorial expression of proteins called transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences and turn on and off sets of genes. Our understanding of this cellular programming is rudimentary, but a more complete characterization could enable the conversion of one cell type into another with transformative therapeutic consequences. We have devised a machine learning technique that identifies the genomic binding location of a large number of transcription factors in a given cell state based on an experimental dataset called DNase-Seq, and we...

    Posted date: April 02, 2013
  • Mechanisms of master regulator hand-off during red blood cell development

    So-called master regulators are transcription factor proteins whose individual expression can effect a change in cell identity by either directly co-binding with other factors to target specific gene regulation sites, or through the activation of broad signaling pathways. However, what precipitates the transition from one master-regulated state to another is typically not as well understood. For example, during the developmental transition from hematopoietic stem cells to red blood cells the Gata2 master regulator gives way to Gata1, binding different genomic sites despite their...

    Posted date: April 02, 2013
  • Investigating Natural Language Tools for Artificial Intelligence.

    The Infolab seeks UROPs interested in investigating natural language tools for artificial intelligence. The Infolab works on question answering, parsing, generating, and more, using both symbolic and statistical techniques. Introductory projects range from integrating knowledge sources to expanding automated methods to creating user interfaces and APIs; continuing opportunities for more in-depth research are available.

    Contact: Boris Katz, boris@csail.mit.edu

    Posted date: March 28, 2013