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  • Heads of NSA, FBI, Akamai to discuss cybersecurity at CSAIL summit w/CNBC & Aspen InstituteThe Aspen Institute, CNBC, and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) are organizing the first-ever “Cambridge Cyber Summit” on October 5 at Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus. The one-day summit will bring together C-suite executives and business owners with public and...
  • Automated screening for childhood communication disordersFor children with speech and language disorders, early-childhood intervention can make a great difference in their later academic and social success. But many such children — one study estimates 60 percent — go undiagnosed until kindergarten or even later. Researchers at the Computer Science and...
  • NSA Director Admiral Michael Rogers to open Cambridge Cyber Summit 10/5It was announced today that National Security Agency Director and US Cyber Command Commander Admiral Michael Rogers will open our upcoming Cambridge Cyber Summit October 5, in conversation with The Aspen Institute’s President and CEO, Walter Isaacson. Join us to hear insights from Fort Meade as the...
  • Cache management improved once againA year ago, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory unveiled a fundamentally new way of managing memory on computer chips, one that would use circuit space much more efficiently as chips continue to comprise more and more cores, or processing units. In chips...
  • Y. Bryce Kim PhD `17 wins NSF awardThis month CSAIL PhD candidate Yongwook Bryce Kim ‘17 received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Award for Young Professionals Contributing to Smart and Connected Health at the 38th Annual IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC’16). The theme of the conference was “empowering...
  • Detecting emotions with wireless signalsAs many a relationship book can tell you, understanding someone else’s emotions can be a difficult task. Facial expressions aren’t always reliable: a smile can conceal frustration, while a poker face might mask a winning hand. But what if technology could tell us how someone is really feeling?...
  • An autonomous fleet for AmsterdamMIT has signed an agreement to engage in research collaborations with the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS) in the Netherlands. The collaboration’s flagship project will be co-led by Daniela Rus, director of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence...
  • Faster parallel computingIn today’s computer chips, memory management is based on what computer scientists call the principle of locality: If a program needs a chunk of data stored at some memory location, it probably needs the neighboring chunks as well. But that assumption breaks down in the age of big data, now that...
  • CSAIL director Daniela Rus on robots, AI & how to get girls into codingCSAIL Director Daniela Rus sat down with Forbes Magazine to discuss robotics, artificial intelligence, and inspiring other women in the field of computer science. “Our goal is to invent the future of computing. We want to use computer science to tackle major challenges in fields like healthcare and...
  • CSAIL to host “Cambridge Cyber Summit” with CNBC & Aspen Institute 10/5Today the Aspen Institute, CNBC, and MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) announced the first-ever “Cambridge Cyber Summit” on October 5 at Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus. The one-day summit will bring together C-suite executives and business owners with public and...
  • How machine learning can help with voice disordersThere’s no human instinct more basic than speech, and yet, for many people, talking can be taxing. One in 14 working-age Americans suffer from voice disorders that are often associated with abnormal vocal behaviors — some of which can cause damage to vocal cord tissue and lead to the formation of...
  • This app will make you a safer driverIn April CSAIL researchers led the launch of EverDrive, an app aimed at improving people's driving by measuring habits like speeding, acceleration, hard turning, harsh braking and phone distractions. This week the team's spinoff company, Cambridge Mobile Telematics (CMT), crunched the...
  • Solving network congestionThere are few things more frustrating than trying to use your phone on a crowded network. With phone usage growing faster than wireless spectrum, we’re all now fighting over smaller and smaller bits of bandwidth. Spectrum crunch is such a big problem that the White House is getting involved,...
  • Programmable network routersLike all data networks, the networks that connect servers in giant server farms, or servers and workstations in large organizations, are prone to congestion. When network traffic is heavy, packets of data can get backed up at network routers or dropped altogether. Also like all data networks, big...
  • Researcher named to Tech Review’s 2016 “Under 35” listCSAIL researcher Dinesh Bharadia was just named by MIT Technology Review to their annual list of the top innovators under the age of 35, joining the likes of Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, and major leaders from Apple, PayPal and other tech companies....
  • NASA launches $1 million challenge to program space robotsIn the spring CSAIL received a six-foot-tall, 300-pound humanoid robot that NASA hopes to have serve on future space missions to Mars and beyond. This week, NASA formally opened registration for its Space Robotics Challenge, which involves research teams programming Valkyrie for a variety...
  • MIT team: over 4,000 gas leaks in Boston may have gone unrepaired last yearGas leaks are bad news for many reasons. They contribute to greenhouse gas buildup, disproportionately contribute to methane emissions, and can be physically dangerous to the people around them.But according to a team led by a CSAIL data scientist, utility companies like National grid and...
  • Simit programming language can speed up simulations 200x, reduce code 90 percentComputer simulations of physical systems are common in science, engineering, and entertainment, but they use several different types of tools. If, say, you want to explore how a crack forms in an airplane wing, you need a very precise physical model of the crack’s immediate vicinity. But if you...
  • Cybersecurity paper on government backdoors earns 2016 EFF awardA team from CSAIL has been awarded the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) 2016 Pioneer Award for their paper “Keys Under Doormats” on government backdoors and data security. EFF instituted the award in 1992 to spotlight those dedicated to expanding freedom and creativity in the technology sector....
  • Protecting privacy in genomic databasesGenome-wide association studies, which try to find correlations between particular genetic variations and disease diagnoses, are a staple of modern medical research. But because they depend on databases that contain people’s medical histories, they carry privacy risks. An attacker armed with...
  • Where do America's worst drivers live?In April CSAIL researchers led the launch of EverDrive, an app aimed at improving people's driving by measuring habits like speeding, acceleration, hard turning, harsh braking and phone distractions. This week the team from Cambridge Mobile Telematics (CMT) crunched three months of numbers to...
  • Reach in and touch objects in videos with “Interactive Dynamic Video”We learn a lot about objects by manipulating them: poking, pushing, prodding, and then seeing how they react. We obviously can’t do that with videos — just try touching that cat video on your phone and see what happens. But is it crazy to think that we could take that video and simulate how the cat...
  • Professor Emeritus Seymour Papert, pioneer of constructionist learning, dies at 88Seymour Papert, whose ideas and inventions transformed how millions of children around the world create and learn, died Sunday at his home in East Blue Hill, Maine. He was 88.
  • First major database of non-native EnglishAfter thousands of hours of work, MIT researchers have released the first major database of fully annotated English sentences written by non-native speakers. The researchers who led the project had already shown that the grammatical quirks of non-native speakers writing in English could be a source...
  • App detects light for the visually impairedWe humans rely on light for a profoundly wide range of activities, from aiding circadian rhythms, to regulating mental health, to the simple task of figuring out if our Wi-Fi router is on.But for those who are blind or visually impaired, locating sources of light can be a difficult process....
  • New movie screen allows for glasses-free 3-D at a larger scale3-D movies immerse us in new worlds and allow us to see places and things in ways that we otherwise couldn’t. But behind every 3-D experience is something that is uniformly despised: those goofy glasses. Fortunately, there may be hope. In a new paper, a team from MIT’s Computer Science and...
  • "Astute Assistants" photo series spotlights CSAIL staffOne playful portrait was enough to become the catalyst for a photographic series highlighting the administrative assistants of CSAIL.  When MIT professor Daniel Jackson caught sight of Patrice Macaluso holding a sparkling Elizabeth Taylor book, he wanted to photograph her holding it. When...
  • Acoustic-filtering system could spur better earmuffs, mufflers & even musical instrumentsA team from CSAIL has helped develop a simulation method called "Acoustic Voxels" that allows them to develop acoustic filters that can reduce certain sounds and amplify others. With researchers at Disney Research and Columbia University, the team has discovered a way to predict acoustic...
  • JuliaCon draws global users of a dynamic, easy-to-learn programming language"Julia is a great tool." That's what New York University professor of economics and Nobel laureate Thomas J. Sargent told 250 engineers, computer scientists, programmers, and data scientists at the third annual JuliaCon held at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory...
  • Robert Fano, computing pioneer and founder of CSAIL, dies at 98Robert “Bob” Fano, a professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) whose work helped usher in the personal computing age, died in Naples, Florida on July 13. He was 98. During his time on the faculty at MIT, Fano conducted research across multiple...
  • Robot helps nurses schedule tasks on labor floorToday’s robots are awkward co-workers because they are often unable to predict what humans need. In hospitals, robots are employed to perform simple tasks such as delivering supplies and medications, but they have to be explicitly told what to do. A team from MIT’s Computer Science and...
  • What ants teach us about exploring networks efficientlyAnts, it turns out, are extremely good at estimating the concentration of other ants in their vicinity. This ability appears to play a role in several communal activities, particularly in the voting procedure whereby an ant colony selects a new nest. Biologists have long suspected that ants base...
  • How to stay anonymous onlineAnonymity networks protect people living under repressive regimes from surveillance of their Internet use. But the recent discovery of vulnerabilities in the most popular of these networks — Tor — has prompted computer scientists to try to come up with more secure anonymity schemes. At the Privacy...
  • Democratizing databasesWhen an organization needs a new database, it typically hires a contractor to build it or buys a heavily supported product customized to its industry sector. Usually, the organization already owns all the data it wants to put in the database. But writing complex queries in SQL or some other...
  • Ce Liu PhD ’16 wins Young Researcher AwardCe Liu PhD ’16 is the 2016 recipient of the Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition’s Young Researcher Award. The Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI) award is given to a researcher within 7 years of the completion of their PhD for outstanding early career research...
  • Broderick doubly awarded at ISBA 2016 World MeetingTamara Broderick has received two awards at the 2016 World Meeting of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis (ISBA) that took place in June 2016 in Sardinia. ISBA is the largest scientific society devoted to the development and promotion of Bayesian methods and their analysis. The first...
  • Teaching machines to predict the futureWhen we see two people meet, we can often predict what happens next: a handshake, a hug, or maybe even a kiss. Our ability to anticipate actions is thanks to intuitions born out of a lifetime of experiences. Machines, on the other hand, have trouble making use of complex knowledge like that....
  • Parallel programming made easyComputer chips have stopped getting faster. For the past 10 years, chips’ performance improvements have come from the addition of processing units known as cores. In theory, a program on a 64-core machine would be 64 times as fast as it would be on a single-core machine. But it rarely works out...
  • Analog computing returnsA transistor, conceived of in digital terms, has two states: on and off, which can represent the 1s and 0s of binary arithmetic. But in analog terms, the transistor has an infinite number of states, which could, in principle, represent an infinite range of mathematical values. Digital computing,...
  • CSAIL hosts 3rd annual Julia conference June 21-25The third Julia conference will take place June 21-25 at CSAIL. Named for the programming language that was developed at CSAIL, the conference features cutting-edge technical talks, hands-on workshops, a chance to rub shoulders with Julia's creators, and a weekend in a city known for its historical...
  • Eye-tracking system uses ordinary cellphone cameraFor the past 40 years, eye-tracking technology — which can determine where in a visual scene people are directing their gaze — has been widely used in psychological experiments and marketing research, but it’s required pricey hardware that has kept it from finding consumer applications. Researchers...
  • Artificial intelligence produces realistic sounds that fool humansFor robots to navigate the world, they need to be able to make reasonable assumptions about their surroundings and what might happen during a sequence of events. One way that humans come to learn these things is through sound. For infants, poking and prodding objects is not just fun; some...
  • Where bio, AI and engineering meetJames Weis began merging the biological and computational worlds early on. A young marine biology enthusiast, Weis was building coral reef ecosystems in his aquariums at home before he was a teenager. Unhappy with chain pet stores that kept their wild-caught fish and coral in poor conditions, Weis...
  • A method to image black holesResearchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Harvard University have developed a new algorithm that could help astronomers produce the first image of a black hole. The algorithm would stitch together data collected from radio telescopes scattered around the...
  • Super Mario Brothers isn't just hard - it's NP-hard.Completing a game of “Super Mario Brothers” can be hard — very, very hard. That’s the conclusion of a new paper from researchers at CSAIL, the University of Ottawa, and Bard College at Simon’s Rock. They show that the problem of solving a level in “Super Mario Brothers” is as hard as the hardest...
  • Automatic bug finderSymbolic execution is a powerful software-analysis tool that can be used to automaticallylocate and even repair programming bugs. Essentially, it traces out every path that a program’s execution might take. But it tends not to work well with applications written using today’s programming frameworks...
  • MIT team earns silver at ACM's global programming competitionThis week the MIT Progamming Team earned silver at the World Finals of the Association for Computing Machinery's 40th annual International College Programming Contest (ICPC) in Phuket, Thailand. The world's most prestigious programming contest, ICPC involves 300,000 students from two...
  • A learn-by-doing approach to codingComputer science and engineering, a.k.a. CS or Course 6-3, was the most heavily enrolled major at MIT in the 2015-2016 academic year, with 594 undergraduates. The major has grown rapidly over the last several years, and with this growth CS faculty noticed students were starting out with a range of...
  • MIT launches $5 billion "Campaign for a Better World"This past week MIT officially launched a new fundraising initiative aimed at advancing the institute's research and scholarship on some of the world's biggest challenges.  Called the "MIT Campaign for a Better World", the effort aims to raise $5 billion that will go towards topics like...
  • Ingestible origami robot can patch wounds inside your stomach!In experiments involving a simulation of the human esophagus and stomach, researchers at CSAIL, the University of Sheffield, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have demonstrated a tiny origami robot that can unfold itself from a swallowed capsule and, steered by external magnetic fields, crawl...
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